The SEA Gas Story

Construction of the SEA Gas Pipeline

Construction of the SEA Gas pipeline commenced in October 2002, 180 km south east of Adelaide near Tintinara.

Preparing the Pipeline Route

The entire pipeline route was cleared and graded to provide a safe working area for the construction crews. Areas were set aside so that topsoil could be stock-piled to allow for full restoration of the disturbed areas after the pipeline had been laid. Special care was taken to protect environmentally sensitive areas.

Specialised machinery was used to dig the trench in which the pipeline would be laid.

A continuous bucket excavator makes light work of sandy soils A continuous bucket excavator makes light work of sandy soils
A continuous bucket excavator makes light work of sandy soils.

Laying the Pipe

Laying the pipe Laying the pipe
Line pipe arrived by sea and was delivered to site by road and rail.
Pipe sections were “strung” along the route prior to welding.

 

Laying the pipe Laying the pipe
The pipeline was lowered into the trench and back-filled.

Pipeline Compression

To keep the gas flowing on its 680 km trip from Port Campbell to Adelaide, the gas needs to be compressed along the way. A compressor is a pump specifically designed for gas.

Two compressors have been installed to date, one near Hamilton in Victoria and the other near Coomandook in South Australia.

The maximum allowable pipeline operating pressure is 15 mega-pascals or a little under 150 times atmospheric pressure.

A Solar “Centaur” compressor plus gas turbine driver. The Coomandook compressor station
A Solar “Centaur” compressor plus gas turbine driver. The Coomandook compressor station.

Each compressor station is equipped with a Solar “Centaur” compressor plus gas turbine driver. Each unit is rated at 4.5 MW, roughly equivalent to thirty Commodore sedans.

Login

Lost your password?